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3 Social Content Snafus To Avoid When Engaging With Hispanic Millennials

(Posted on Feb 22, 2016 at 01:41PM by ComproCoches)

Media Post
by Ori Hofnung

When it comes to publishing and content marketing, what gets professionals more excited than millennials? Hispanic millennials.

After all, the more specific you can get with your audience targeting, the better engagement performance you’ll see. And the Spanish-speaking millennial is one of the most alluring, yet dreadfully misunderstood, ethno-demographics.

Hispanic millennials have enormous spending power, which is growing rapidly. About half of all U.S.-based Latinos are millennials, and about a quarter of all U.S.-based millennials are Latinos. They’re upwardly mobile, too, thanks to a set of values that emphasizes the home, higher education, fiscal responsibility and entrepreneurship.

Improving Global Engagement Tactics

Millennial, Spanish-speaking media audiences are finally coming into their own, with a great deal of demand from around the world to reach them and engage with them in a meaningful manner. Few agencies, brands and publishers are creating content experiences that match the values and consumption habits of this sector, and as a result, few are finding that their media activity actually drives noteworthy performance. But it seems like the tide may be turning.

Late last year, I had the honor of participating in a panel at the FICOD conference in Madrid, one of the largest gatherings of Spanish-speaking digital media professionals in the world. Sharing the stage with Alfredo Murillo, who is the founding editor of BuzzFeed España, and engagement experts from leading news publications, we discussed content consumption patterns of millennial audiences.

Based on the extended questions and answers session that followed the panel, and on my ongoing discussions with the players in this sector, I’ve compiled these three common misconceptions about Hispanic young adults and media.

1. Thinking It’s a Homogenous Group

The Spanish-speaking world spans continents and includes scores of distinct cultures – as well as countless subcultures. Want your message to resonate with Catalonians and Miami-based Cubans alike? Time to rethink your strategy.

In our experience, localizing your editorial calendar to take these niches into account is the way to go. But hybrid identities come into play as well, especially in the U.S., where immigrants and children of immigrants are struggling to find themselves in the context of their adopted cultures. According to a study recently commissioned by PopSugar, for example, less than one-third of U.S. Latina millennials identify with the Latina portrayals they see in mainstream media.

2. Underestimating the Revenue Potential

There’s no need to go into the false stereotypes about Hispanics and their economic prowess. As we’ve seen in the stats listed at the top of this page, these stereotypes are simply untrue.

A recent study by the Association of Hispanic Advertising Agencies (AHAA) even went so far as to demonstrate that brands which aggressively target Hispanics are seeing faster growth than brands that don’t. 

3. Assuming It’ll Be Easy to Break In

Now that the word is out that there’s money to be made by creating content in Spanish, it seems like everyone’s coming out of the woodwork and trying to get in on the action. With great opportunity comes great competition. Carlos Santiago, CEO at Burbank-based Santiago Solutions Group, is predicting a major spike in Latino-targeting ad spend this year, for one.

But to reach Spanish-speakers effectively and drive real engagement, professionals need to truly understand the market. 

Onwards and Upwards

It’s an exciting time to be involved with Spanish-language media. Momentum is building, and as a whole, the industry is waking up to the gargantuan opportunities to be found by offering content experiences that are snackable, mobile-friendly, visual and optimized for social engagement.


Why Visual Content And Video Are So Popular With Latino Consumers

(Posted on Jan 26, 2016 at 10:14AM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by 
Erin Conrad


In an era of social media dominance, it comes as no surprise that visual content reigns supreme. The Latina social influencer community, in particular, distinctly prefer visual platforms like Snapchat, Instagram and Pinterest. Why? The top Latina influencers tend to cover beauty, fashion and travel categories, making visual content key when crafting their stories. In fact, Hispanic Pinterest users increased to 21% in 2014, up from 18% the year before but is still a developing platform for Latinas and nearly 34% of Hispanics use Instagram, compared to 21% of white adult Internet users.

With more and more content being generated every day, visuals are a simple way to stand out from the pack of social influencers. For Latina bloggers, photos and especially video content enables them to communicate ideas in spite of language barriers. When it comes to video, Hispanics are more likely to visit video-sharing sites like YouTube, versus non-Hispanics (81% versus 69%). They also spend more time consuming digital video online and on mobile devices than the general market. A Nielsen report found that Hispanics spend over 90 minutes more watching video than other users. For brands that have placed a high priority on connecting and engaging with Latino consumers online, visual content like video a key part of their social strategy.  

In general, Latinos look to and value the opinions of their “inner circle” when making purchase decisions or learning something new. Until recently, there was little culturally relevant content available. Unlike television, where Latino audiences were forced to wait for producers to create shows or cast Latino leads, the emergence of social media enabled to Latinos create their own video content. 

Shows from traditional television media channels like Univision and Telemundo were not reaching the entire population and young, bi-cultural Latinos were looking for non-stereotypical representation in both English and Spanish. The same gap was felt in brand marketing. Most marketers traditionally think that Hispanic marketing means translating English messages into Spanish, the right messaging and cultural cues are what resonate most with the largest part of the population. For brands, focus should be cultural relevance and who is creating the content versus the language it is created in.  

As social media continues to grow in popularity and new platforms appear, the importance of these tools for Latino influencers will remain strong. With newer, visual-focused channels like Periscope overtaking more “traditional” text-heavy platforms, it will be exciting to watch how this influencer community uses and embraces these tools.


Why Smart Marketers Are Engaging Online Hispanics In 2016

(Posted on Jan 16, 2016 at 11:04AM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by Lee Vann, OpEd Contributor
 

Engaging Online Hispanics In 2016As we ease into a new year, we marketers are enthusiastically looking forward to seeing our 2016 marketing plans in action. Marketers who included online Hispanics in their plans should be rewarded by a large, growing audience which engages and transacts predominantly on smartphones. Those marketers who are not engaging digital Hispanics may want to look for ways to add them to this year's plan now. 

A recent study by David Burgos of TNS research provides ample evidence for why smart marketers are engaging online Hispanics this year.

Online Hispanics are leaders 

TNS does a great job segmenting online users by influence and social engagement with an ethnicity overlay. The segmentation includes four discrete groups ranked in order of digital influence and social engagement.

Leaders - Younger, early adopters, mobile centric, heavily influenced and influential on social media. Enjoy engaging with brands.

Connectors - Social is where they spend most of their time online, but they are consumers rather than influencers. 

Observers - The Internet is a huge source of information for this group, but they show little interest in engaging with or being influenced by social media.

Functionals - Little interest in digital technology.

TNS found that 50% of U.S. Hispanics fall into the “Leaders” segment, compared to only 34% of the overall U.S. market. Interestingly, TNS found that Hispanics who are Spanish-dominant or bilingual are more likely to be in the Leader segment when compared to English-dominant Hispanics. By language profile:

  • Spanish-dominant Hispanics: 52% Leaders
  • Bilingual Hispanics: 52% 
  • English-dominant Hispanics: 43%

Burgos also found that 53% of Hispanic millennials are digital “Leaders” vs. 47% of all U.S. millennials.

These findings are profound but not entirely new. The majority of online Hispanics, regardless of language preference or age, are early adopters, are heavily influenced and influential on social media, and enjoy engaging with brands. 

As I went through Burgos’ study, I fondly remembered the first Hispanic social media segmentation work done by Tamara Barber of Forrester Research in 2010. Six years ago, she found essentially the same thing as TNS.

Online Hispanics enjoy engaging with brands and transacting

If you made it this far in the post, you might be looking for a bit more data to support your recommendation to target online Hispanics. The TNS data has a plethora of information, but here are my favorite data points as they highlight how Hispanics engage with brands and transact online relative to the U.S. market:

  • Research products before a purchase - 137 index to U.S. market
  • Mobile search in-store - 174
  • Purchase products online - 146
  • Access a brand's online service - 137
  • Read emails from brands - 142
  • Like or engage a brand - 180
  • Forward brand content - 212
  • Write about brands online - 217
  • Ask a question to a brand - 221

If you are engaging with online Hispanics in 2016, you will undoubtedly be rewarded by this large audience who is very open to engaging with brands and buying online.

If you are not engaging with online Hispanics in 2016, why not


Is 2015 The Best Year Yet For Hispanic Digital Marketing?

(Posted on Dec 23, 2015 at 03:18AM by ComproCoches)

Media Post
by Lee Vann

The Hispanic digital marketing industry

The Hispanic digital marketing industry has evolved exponentially this year as more and more brands realize that to grow, they must win with online Hispanics. As a result, brands are increasing their investments in Hispanic digital marketing, which in turn has sparked innovation and growth across the Hispanic digital industry.

Here are four key trends from 2015:

Mobile usage among Hispanics skyrocketed

More data points to the fact that U.S. Hispanics, across segments, are mobile mavens. As I pointed out in a post early this year, if you are targeting Hispanics, you must think mobile first. 

Here’s why:

  • 45% of U.S. Hispanics now use their phones to go online more than they use a computer, compared to only 38% of non-Hispanics
  • Older Hispanics skew higher in many mobile activities
  • 37% of all U.S. Hispanics adults say they often use their cell phone while watching television, compared with 29% of non-Hispanics
  • 24% of U.S. Hispanics pay for a physical good with their phone vs. 13% non-Hispanics

Hispanic e-commerce is surging

To me this is the most important trend in Hispanic digital marketing. Smart brands are investing in reaching online Hispanics and driving them down the path to purchase because Hispanics are more likely to buy online. 

  • 54.1% of U.S. Hispanics have purchased electronics on a PC vs. 53.5% of non-Hispanics
  • 24.8% of U.S. Hispanics have purchased food on a PC vs. 23.% of non-Hispanics
  • 18.4% of U.S. Hispanics have purchased personal care items on a cell phone vs. 10.8% of non-Hispanics

The fact that more and more Hispanics are engaging in e-commerce is also having a profound effect on the industry as a whole. As consumers increasingly turn to digital channels to research and purchase goods, brands are better able to quantify the return on their digital marketing investments. This is leading to more investments in digital marketing, which will drive further innovation and industry growth. 

Hispanic influencer and content marketing is gaining steam

The intersection of content marketing and Hispanic marketing has given rise to a vibrant Hispanic influencer and content marketing industry. As I wrote in July of this year, native advertising is projected to be a $21 billion industry by 2018 and, according to Curata, 76% of marketers are increasing investment in content marketing. 

From a Hispanic perspective, we know that Hispanics are hungry for relevant content and brands that provide it will be rewarded with long-term, profitable relationships. Brands that develop content for Hispanics have a myriad of efficient content distribution options across leading Hispanic publishers and social networks. 

In addition, Hispanic influencers are becoming increasingly important when it comes to creating and amplifying brand content and the Hispanic influencer industry is quickly maturing. For instance, Latino influencer network Mitú snagged $15 million in a series B funding round, social influencer software Tapinfluence teamed up with Latina Bloggers Connect and Latina Mom Bloggers rebranded as DiMe Media to expand their reach.

Facebook doubled down on digital Hispanics

If you need clear evidence to invest in the Hispanic digital marketing, here it is. This year, Facebook continued to invest in their Hispanic targeting capabilities by increasing their Hispanic affinity segment by 2 million people. Today, marketers can accurately target 29.1 million Hispanics on Facebook by language preference. Marketers can overlay this Hispanic data with Facebook’s rich insights to target Hispanics by interest, geography, behavior, purchase intent and more. What’s more, brands can now leverage Facebook’s Hispanic affinity segments to target Hispanics on Instagram.

Having dedicated the past 15 years to Hispanic digital marketing, I must say that 2015 was a one of the best I have seen. I have a feeling that 2016 will be even better.

Editor's note: This article originally appeared on Nov. 12, 2015, in Engage:Hispanics.


Five Insights For Reaching Hispanic Consumers In 2016

(Posted on Dec 11, 2015 at 03:51AM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by Holly Pavlika

Engaging Hispanics

There is no doubt that Hispanics are a growing and important market for brands and retailers. For those looking to reach Hispanics consumers in 2016, below are five important thoughts to keep in mind from notable industry experts. 

1. Sponsor brands that promote Hispanic “techies” and technical bloggers.
Rebecca Castrelon, online community manager, MXM: “According to Nielsen Consumer Insights, Hispanics are the largest group using mobile devices for any type of transaction, from banking to watching movies. Additionally, Hispanics have become ‘super consumers’ of mobile marketing, making them the most desired market for telecommunication companies. From Metro PCS to Boost Mobile and Verizon, these companies have increased their market share in order to reach this audience in 2015, a trend that will continue to grow next year, according to NAHP’s latest data, that shows that more than 49% of Hispanics are planning for change their smartphones in the next six months.”

2. Hispanic consumers will demand more from brands.
Tara Jaye Frank, VP, multicultural strategy, Hallmark Cards:“Hispanic consumers will begin to demand more from products, services and experiences. Underserved consumer groups tend to ride an expectation curve of sorts when it comes to brands. At early introduction, they may be delighted to get invited to the party. Over time, they desire more: ‘Do these parties play the music I like? Serve the food I eat? Speak my preferred language?’ The faster the Hispanic population grows, the less satisfied they'll be with a ‘nod,’ which is what some brand strategies and marketing campaigns currently deliver. What they really want — and will come to expect, no doubt — is a full embrace.

“Relationships are everything to this consumer, and relationships are impossible to establish without understanding, respect, and reciprocity. Brands will have to stop asking how they can toss Hispanics (or any other targeted population) a proverbial bone. Instead, they'll want to welcome Hispanics to the table, and not only as guests ... but as partners in building the future.”

3. Mobile data will allow for better targeting and tailoring of messages to Hispanic audiences.
Jordan Greene, principal at Mella Media: “Mobile will continue to dramatically improve the blunt instrument of Hispanic marketing in 2016. With better actionable data and targeting, mobile advertisers can begin to truly carve up the Hispanic audience into appropriate sub-groups, and tailor messages to evoke better results. So the Dominican market in New York can be addressed differently than Mexican audiences in communities throughout the U.S.  Reliance on geography, content or language as primary drivers is over. We will be able to reach the targeted consumer behind the device. As Hispanic audiences tend to use the mobile phone as a primary Internet device more than the average consumer, they also provide back significantly more data. Converting those pieces into usable insights will be critical in 2016, and its subsequent targeting will finally enable marketers to reach the multiple micro-Hispanic audiences they have craved.”

4. Shift from big data to effective data when targeting Hispanic consumers.
Deigo Figueroa, SVP, director of strategy and participation, Lapis USA: “While in the past two years the concept of big data has trickled its way into Hispanic marketing forums and conversations, 2016 will see a more developed understanding and application of the mobile data tools and resources amongst the most mobile-forward demographic. With not only more, but also better and more detailed information, an increase of the marketing dollars allocated to mobile for the segment is imminent.

“The challenge in this new context will be to translate the increased interest and investment into better, fine-tuned programs based on the segment’s behavior and detailed contextual information that at the same time will allow marketers to get comprehensive data and better measurement indicators that so far have been the Achilles heel in Hispanic marketing.”

5. Online video is the most effective medium for Hispanic content.
Maria Goycoolea, social engagement supervisor, MXM: “Hispanics spend most of their leisure time at home consuming content. Aside from broadcast TV, Hispanics Millennials — who we all know are one of the predominant cohorts among Hispanics — are more likely to also utilize online video sources or streaming services for content consumption. Nielsen also states that ‘Latinos stream 6 hours and 15 minutes of online video per month, 60% more than non-Hispanic users.’ To remain being relevant and win U.S. Hispanics, marketers and brands will put more emphasis on video content specifically targeted to and designed for Hispanics.”


The Total Market Approach Starts With Why

(Posted on Nov 16, 2015 at 12:51PM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by Joe Kutchera


hispanic Marketing

Whenever I hear the term “Total Market Approach” to Hispanic marketing, I scrunch my face in doubt since it strikes me as a “one size fits all” path to cost reduction. Perhaps some marketers do use it to avoid the difficult work in segmenting multicultural audiences or as a means to consolidate the advertising agencies they hire. But last week, at the Association of National Advertisers’Multicultural Conference, a handful of companies provided examples that not only edified me as to what the term “Total Market Approach” exactly means but, moreover, changed my opinion in the process by providing examples of their work.

To less sophisticated marketers, Hispanic advertising equates to:

  1. Translating advertising copy into Spanish
  2. Throwing in some soccer balls 
  3. Actors wearing mariachi hats 
  4. Adding salsa music with a touch of “café con leche” 

But these stereotypes only provide superficial, quick-fix approaches. 

Which leads us to the question: Why do you do what you do? Your response will inform not only the mission of your entire company but make your Hispanic marketing more authentic.

Simon Sinek wrote his book, Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action, to show that the best companies, like Apple, clearly define why they do what they do. Organizations can explain “what” they do or “how” they do it. But very few clearly articulate “why” they do what they do, or in other words, their mission. Yes, other companies may sell smartphones or computers. But very few companies boil down their passion for simplifying the experience of listening to music and making technology beautiful as succinctly as Apple does. (If you haven’t seen it, Sinek’s TED talk summarizes his book in 18 minutes and is well worth it.)

Engage Hispanics

Christine Paige, SVP of Marketing and Digital Services at Kaiser Permanente, cited Sinek’s model in her presentation at the ANA Multicultural Conference to explain her company’s purpose and the strategy behind its total market message, “Thrive.”

Seventy years ago, industrialist Henry J. Kaiser and physician Sidney Garfield founded the integrated managed care non-profit as a means of providing health care to ship yard workers and their families during World War II. Paige says, “That set the tone for serving people who otherwise would not have access to healthcare.” Today, that remains the foundation for the organization’s mission to “provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve.”

To accomplish this, Paige says, “Communication between the physician and the patient is key. You cannot deliver quality care if you cannot adequately communicate, which is both linguistic and also cultural. In order to deliver quality care you actually have to provide training on how to connect with your patients.”

Kaiser Permanente operates in eight states including California, a “majority minority” state, where historic minorities like Hispanics represent more than 50% of the total population. Paige says, “We recruit as aggressively as possible against the composition of our membership and do a lot of training. For example, our physicians in Southern California learn Spanish so that we can increase the number of caregivers who speak the language of our patients.” She pointed out that “our strongest market share by ethnic group is African-American and Latino.”

In addition, Kaiser Permanente provides quality medical content in Spanish. It provides full patient medical records in both Spanish and English to members in Southern California, via secure login on KP.org. Members can send a message to physicians, see lab results, and order prescriptions in both languages.

KP’s tagline is “Thrive,” which it translated into Spanish as “Viva Bien.” Paige says, “After we did the inside work that led to Thrive, we validated the approach for the Spanish-speaking audience. It is the same advertising but with a different voice over. The message of the campaign is so universal that it does not need additional contextualizing. And we cast our ads with a diverse set of actors.”

Seventy years since its founding, KP continues as a non-profit. Paige says, “As a not-for-profit, we take our community contribution very seriously. Last year, the company earned $56 billion in revenue and $2 billion of it went back into community programs.”

“We make long-term investments in things like prostate cancer screenings, for example. And while this may cost us something, we are going to have these members 20 and 30 years from now. So why don't we do the screening for that now.” 

In conclusion, successful Hispanic marketing never comes from creating a façade with superficial, quick-fix approaches. It needs to come from the heart and soul of an organization. A clearly defined “Why” or mission statement sets the foundation to authenticity. 

What do you think? Has your company clearly answered the question: why does your organization exist? 

Is 2015 The Best Year Yet For Hispanic Digital Marketing?

(Posted on Nov 15, 2015 at 02:39AM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by Lee Vann
 

The Hispanic CultureWith the holidays around the corner and 2015 coming to a close, I took some time to reflect back on what’s happened in Hispanic digital marketing. I must say, it was quite a year.

The Hispanic digital marketing industry has evolved exponentially this year as more and more brands realize that to grow, they must win with online Hispanics. As a result, brands are increasing their investments in Hispanic digital marketing, which in turn has sparked innovation and growth across the Hispanic digital industry.

Here are four key trends from 2015:

Mobile usage among Hispanics skyrocketed

More data points to the fact that U.S. Hispanics, across segments, are mobile mavens. As I pointed out in a post early this year, if you are targeting Hispanics, you must think mobile first. 

Here’s why:

  • 45% of U.S. Hispanics now use their phones to go online more than they use a computer, compared to only 38% of non-Hispanics
  • Older Hispanics skew higher in many mobile activities
  • 37% of all U.S. Hispanics adults say they often use their cell phone while watching television, compared with 29% of non-Hispanics
  • 24% of U.S. Hispanics pay for a physical good with their phone vs. 13% non-Hispanics

Hispanic e-commerce is surging

To me this is the most important trend in Hispanic digital marketing. Smart brands are investing in reaching online Hispanics and driving them down the path to purchase because Hispanics are more likely to buy online. 

  • 54.1% of U.S. Hispanics have purchased electronics on a PC vs. 53.5% of non-Hispanics
  • 24.8% of U.S. Hispanics have purchased food on a PC vs. 23.% of non-Hispanics
  • 18.4% of U.S. Hispanics have purchased personal care items on a cell phone vs. 10.8% of non-Hispanics

The fact that more and more Hispanics are engaging in e-commerce is also having a profound effect on the industry as a whole. As consumers increasingly turn to digital channels to research and purchase goods, brands are better able to quantify the return on their digital marketing investments. This is leading to more investments in digital marketing, which will drive further innovation and industry growth. 

Hispanic influencer and content marketing is gaining steam

The intersection of content marketing and Hispanic marketing has given rise to a vibrant Hispanic influencer and content marketing industry. As I wrote in July of this year, native advertising is projected to be a $21 billion industry by 2018 and, according to Curata, 76% of marketers are increasing investment in content marketing. 

From a Hispanic perspective, we know that Hispanics are hungry for relevant content and brands that provide it will be rewarded with long-term, profitable relationships. Brands that develop content for Hispanics have a myriad of efficient content distribution options across leading Hispanic publishers and social networks. 

In addition, Hispanic influencers are becoming increasingly important when it comes to creating and amplifying brand content and the Hispanic influencer industry is quickly maturing. For instance, Latino influencer network Mitú snagged $15 million in a series B funding round, social influencer software Tapinfluence teamed up with Latina Bloggers Connect and Latina Mom Bloggers rebranded as DiMe Media to expand their reach.

Facebook doubled down on digital Hispanics

If you need clear evidence to invest in the Hispanic digital marketing, here it is. This year, Facebook continued to invest in their Hispanic targeting capabilities by increasing their Hispanic affinity segment by 2 million people. Today, marketers can accurately target 29.1 million Hispanics on Facebook by language preference. Marketers can overlay this Hispanic data with Facebook’s rich insights to target Hispanics by interest, geography, behavior, purchase intent and more. What’s more, brands can now leverage Facebook’s Hispanic affinity segments to target Hispanics on Instagram.

Having dedicated the past 15 years to Hispanic digital marketing, I must say that 2015 was a one of the best I have seen. I have a feeling that 2016 will be even better.

Also See ComproCoches


6 Tips For Working With Latino Influencers

(Posted on Nov 10, 2015 at 04:53PM by ComproCoches)

Media Post
by Holly Pavlika


Hispanic MarketingLatinos are highly social, and while there is a fairly robust community of Latino influencers that brands can work with, there is still a lot education that needs to be done between brands and clients who do not have a full understanding of the Latino market. Below are a list of six tips for engaging with Latino influencers.

1. Creating content in English misses the broader Latino audience.

Often, clients request Latino influencers create blog content in English due to so they can share materials on their owned, English-speaking channels. This helps reach the general market, but it is not the best way to reach the Latino consumer. Instead, choose a mix of Latino influencers to create content in English and in Spanish, or even Spanglish. That way, content resonates with all consumers.

2. Treat Latino influencers differently than general market influencers.

When working with Latino influencers, you must communicate beyond messaging; make small talk and make a real connection. We often find chatting with Latinas on Facebook instead of emails works profoundly better, as Facebook offers a more personal setting. 

3. Ensure messaging is relevant to the influencer.

Latino influencers need to feel that the brand understands their interests and audience, and that the campaign messaging speaks to them both culturally and authentically. This is where making a personal connection becomes critical. Having real conversations with your Latino influencers can not only build relationships, but it is also a key step to assuring influencers will be passionate about your marketing campaign in order to deliver the authentic stories you’re seeking.

4. Mentor your Latino influencers.

We have found that some Latino influencers are less seasoned then general market influencers who have been blogging longer. So, it helps to provide training and mentorship in areas such as SEO or the latest social platforms. Mentoring one-on-one often helps create more successful campaigns in the long run.

5. Be flexible with your social platform selection.

Be careful not to force fit your platform selection or ideas on a Latino influencer. They typically don’t like Pinterest because, unlike Facebook, it is not a platform conducive to having a conversation. We are seeing early signs Latino influencers are embracing Periscope so watch for that platform to grow. 

6. Remember Latino Influencers are not one size fits all.

If you are using Latino influencer and looking to tie into Latino holidays or cultural events, be sure to be thorough in your influencer selection. For example, The Day of The Dead or Día de Muertos is a Mexican celebration. To reach your desired level of engagement, you’ll want to make sure you choose Latino influencers who are of Mexican descent in order for this to be relevant.

Multi-cultural Partnership Marketing Simplified: 'Same, Same But Different'

(Posted on Nov 2, 2015 at 12:08PM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by Jon Goynshor


Marketing to Hispanics

As I recently read a bedtime story to my daughter, I was struck at how a children’s book and my day job could collide. It occurred to me that this story encompassed the hallmarks of multicultural marketing at its best. The book, Same, Same but Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw tells the story of two young pen pals, one from America and one from India, and the similarities and yet nuanced differences in each of their lives. 

In the book, the boys compare and contrast their worlds through letters and drawings of their families, favorite activities, and forms of expression. The author enlightens her young audience to a world not that different from their own. In much the same way, a total market campaign’s overarching similarities can be even more culturally relevant if the right contextual differences are fully explored. And when done right, it does not have to feel like you are creating programs for consumers who live in two totally different worlds.

Multicultural marketing has been traditionally viewed as “Same,” simply a language translation as part of a total market strategy. Others might advocate for “Different,” by creating a completely separate platform with emphasis on the cultural divides. But perhaps “Same, Same but Different” needs to apply to a more behavioral-based model rooted in cultural dimensions. 

In creating a cultural hotspot, one needs to link shopping behaviors to cultural values including “uncertainty avoidance,” the degree to which people can cope with ambiguity or unclear situations, which was conceived by cross-cultural pioneer Geert Hofstede. The good news is that the Same, Same but Different approach does not require wholesale structural changes. Partnerships, whether they are sports, entertainment, or cause related, have very specific points where culture can be dialed up and exert the greatest influence.

The entry points are the 3Cs of culturally relevant partnership marketing: Cultural Context, Content and Communication. By using the 3Cs, one can better create as well as evaluate a multicultural marketing campaign. To emphasize this approach, take for example, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital’s annual “Thanks and Giving” campaign and how the brand modified an overarching platform to be even more culturally relevant and impactful. Here’s how the 3Cs were instrumental and how St. Jude’s used these entry points to achieve relevance and ultimate impact. 

1. Cultural Context: This allows marketers to gain insight on the driving behavioral forces for different demographic groups. Not only do multicultural consumers over-index against social causes but based on the uncertainty avoidance cultural dimension, Hispanics are more likely to trust expert opinions and celebrities in advertising to avoid uncertainty and further reinforce opinions. St. Jude’s celebrity-focused campaign has been consistently reaching Hispanic donors by leveraging this contextually relevant principle. Similar to St. Jude, in order to create the right cultural context, brands needs to link shopping behaviors to cultural values. Based on the uncertainty avoidance dimension, Hispanics trust experts and celebrities to avoid uncertainty and reinforce purchase intent.

2. Content: A partnership marketing campaign must have content. In this example, the content pertains to the celebrity endorsements. In addition, Latino stars who demonstrate a strong work ethic are up to 55% more relatable to Hispanics than to the general market. St. Jude secured culturally relevant celebrities including singer/songwriter and campaign spokesperson Luis Fonsi, as well as Sofia Vergara, Daisy Fuentes, Antonio Banderas and Juanes. This is perhaps the only example in which Jennifer Anniston, the primary spokesperson for St. Jude, simply would not cut it. Brands must recognize that it is not just any content, but contextually relevant content and authority figures that will resonate with multi-cultural audiences. Like the St. Jude’s initiative, celebrities known for having a strong work ethic will resonate much more than just any celebrity, expert or public figure.

3. Communication: Given that 62% of all Hispanics are bi-lingual, while a campaign can have incredible content and context, it must be communicated with the language of the heart to be most impactful. Not only did St. Jude promote this campaign featuring celebrities in bi-lingual TV and radio but they also created a Spanish language website in addition to a video series featuring Latin stars, Raul Gonzalez, Luis Enrique and Prince Royce on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other social networking sites. Furthermore, 62% of Hispanics are using social media to engage with companies around social and environmental issues vs. 51% of the general population. St. Jude communicated their message through social media efforts within the community. Keep in mind the bi-Lingual “language of the heart” communication across the entire purchase decision journey when strategizing your multicultural marketing approach. When spoken by an authoritative figure, this can be a powerful point of difference. 

By leveraging these contextually relevant principles – cosmetically tweaking and dialing up specific points to make it more culturally and contextually relevant – St. Jude’s Hispanic donor engagement has been pushed to record-setting levels. 

Emphasizing the 3C’s is the key to a multi-cultural partnership marketing strategy that can be as simple as a children’s book.


Why Should Online Retailers Care About Spanish-Speaking Hispanics?

(Posted on Oct 22, 2015 at 12:43PM by ComproCoches)
Media Post
by Mario Carrasco


As the online retail wars continue to rage this year with brick and mortar retailers continuing to bolster their online shopping offerings to compete with the 800 pound gorilla, Amazon, we decided to take an in-depth look of how online shopping habits have changed from this year to last across Hispanic, African-American, Asian, and non-Hispanic white consumers.

If we look at the change in online purchasing habits compared to one year ago, you’ll see Hispanics leading the pack in terms of purchasing more online now than last year: 

This is being primarily driving by Hispanics 18-34 of which 64% stated that they are shopping more this year than last but Hispanics 35+ are still to be reckoned with almost 50% stating they are doing more shopping online now than last year. Conversely, non-Hispanics whites lead the pack stating that they are shopping about the same now as compared to last year with almost 50% not changing their online shopping frequency. Also interesting to note is a significant drop in African-Americans shopping online this year vs. last with 20% stating they are shopping less online now than last year. 

Delving deeper into the Hispanic segment by age, we see that the increase in online shopping this year has been driven by the Spanish-dominant and bilingual: 

Conversely, we see that English dominant Hispanics have the biggest share (40%) of shopping about the same this year than last year. 

So what does it all mean?

There is a clearly an opportunity here for retailers to make their U.S. online shopping experience more Spanish friendly. Our data matches up nicely to Google’s 2011—2014 U.S. Indexed Search Query Data highlighting how the number of Google searches that include common Spanish-language question words nearly doubled over the past three years: 

 

A recently released study indicates that Amazon is the starting point for 44% of consumers searching for products, compared to 34% who use search engines. This initially points to Amazon dominating the online sales landscape, however when we look at growth, Google Shopping Same Store Sales (SSS) saw 46.1% growth, driven by higher conversion rates. 

Our data points to a potential competitive advantage Google has over Amazon, Spanish-language search. Google has invested a significant amount of resources to becoming the go-to search engine for all languages in all countries and it looks like it is paying off here in the U.S. 

For Amazon to catch up would be a massive undertaking, translating their site into Spanish for U.S. audiences (they have Amazon Mexico and Spain but searching for “bocina”, for example, will give you different results in each site). 

This gives retailers who have yet to really commit to the online space a chance to integrate a Spanish component to their online presence as they do not have legacy technology and user interface holding them back. The return on investment will be clear as Spanish dominant and bilingual shoppers don’t seem to be slowing down in their trend of purchasing more items online over previous years. 


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